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Incidence of Common Postural Abnormalities in the Cervical, Shoulder, and Thoracic Regions and Their Association with Pain in Two Age Groups of Healthy Subjects

Research Review: Incidence of Common Postural Abnormalities in the Cervical, Shoulder, and Thoracic Regions and Their Association with Pain in Two Age Groups of Healthy Subjects

By Susan Ackerman DPT, PT, PMA-CPT

Edited by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Original Citation:

Griegel-Morris, P., Larson, K., Mueller-Klaus, K., & Oatis, C. A. (1992). Incidence of common postural abnormalities in the cervical, shoulder, and thoracic regions and their association with pain in two age groups of healthy subjects. Physical therapy72(6), 425-431. FULL ARTICLE

Introduction:

Additional research has demonstrated a relationship between upper body postural dysfunction and upper body pain (1-5). Common postural abnormalities of the upper body include forward head posture, rounded shoulders, excessive thoracic kyphosis, and shoulder height asymmetry (6). This 1992 study, out of the Philadelphia Institute of Physical Therapy, demonstrated that participants from two age groups with excessive thoracic kyphosis, forward head, and rounded shoulders had increased incidence of headac

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Electromyographic Analysis of Gluteus Maximus, Gluteus Medius and Tensor Fascia Latae During Therapeutic Exercises With and Without Elastic Resistance

Research Review: Electromyographic Analysis of Gluteus Maximus, Gluteus Medius, and Tensor Fascia Latae During Therapeutic Exercises With and Without Elastic Resistance

 

By Jason Gonzales, MS, NASM PES & CES, NASE CSS Level II, Ironman U Coach

Edited by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Original Citation:

Bishop, B. N., Greenstein, J., Etnoyer‐Slaski, J. L., Sterling, H., & Topp, R. (2018). Electromyographic analysis of gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia latae during therapeutic exercises with and without elastic resistance. International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, 13(4), 668.  ARTICLE

Introduction:

Research has demonstrated that a decrease in gluteus maximus and gluteus medius activity, and an increase in tensor fascia latae (TFL) activity, is correlated with lumbar spine, sacroiliac joint and lower extremity dysfunction (1 - 16). Several additional studies have compared various exercises with the intent of maximizing gluteus maximus and gluteus medius activity, while minimizing the recruitment of synergists (17 - 22). In this 2018 study

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Evidence of Altered Corticomotor Excitability Following Targeted Activation of Gluteus Maximus Training in Healthy Individuals

Research Review: Evidence of Altered Corticomotor Excitability Following Targeted Activation of Gluteus Maximus Training in Healthy Individuals

 

By Jacky Au PhD, CPT

Edited by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Original Citation:

Fisher, B. E., Southam, A. C., Kuo, Y. L., Lee, Y. Y., & Powers, C. M. (2016). Evidence of altered corticomotor excitability following targeted activation of gluteus maximus training in healthy individuals. Neuroreport, 27(6), 415-421. ABSTRACT

Introduction:

The gluteal complex (gluteus maximus, medius, and minimus) is often targeted during lower-extremity rehabilitation and strengthening programs. Specifically, activation exercises are recommended for the gluteus maximus (GM) to preferentially recruit the muscle, increase neuromuscular drive and enhance recruitment (1). The goal of this 2016 study from the University of Southern California was to study the neural changes associated with GM activation exercise. Using combined neurostimulation and electromyography (EMG) methods, researchers found increased excitatory and inhibitory inputs to the GM after interventi

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