Category:

Deep Longitudinal Subsystem (DLS)

Deep Longitudinal Subsystem (DLS) Integration

By Brent Brookbush DPT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, H/FS

The Deep Longitudinal Subsystem (DLS) is comprised of:

  • Thoracolumbar Fascia (Deep Posterior layer)
  • Erector Spinae
  • Rhomboids
  • Splenius Capitis and Splenius Cervicis
  • Sacrotuberous Ligament
  • Biceps Femoris
  • Adductor magnus
  • Piriformis
  • Obturator internus (and deep rotators)
  • Head of Fibula
  • Fibularis Longus

Function (Brief):

The DLS is comprised of muscles with a propensity to act synergistically; rarely do these muscles act as prime movers. This subsystem plays an important role in motion of the tibiofibular joints, hip joints, sacroiliac joints and spine, and may aid in proprioception by altering recruitment strategies based on the load and stretch imparted on the system during heel strike. The DLS is active during gait, forward bending (more so when knees are near full extension), and lumbar extension, and eccentrically decelerates spine flexion, hip flexion, and ankle inversion. Over-activity of the

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Roentgenographic Findings in the Cervical Spine in Asymptomatic Persons

Research Review: Roentgenographic Findings in the Cervical Spine in Asymptomatic Persons

 

By Amy Martinez DPT, PT

Edited by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Original Citation: Gore, D. R. (2001). Roentgenographic findings in the cervical spine in asymptomatic persons: a ten-year follow-up. Spine, 26(22), 2463-2466. - ABSTRACT

Introduction: Research suggests that as much as 20.6% of the general population have, or will have neck pain (1-4). Cervical pain has been correlated with cervical malalignment (5), changes in scapular mechanics, and changes in activity of the cervical muscles, trapezius muscles, and the serratus anterior (8-9). This 2001, 10-year prospective study by an American researcher establishes correlation between chronic neck pain, cervical spine subluxations and degenerative changes. The findings suggest that cervical joint mobility/stiffness should be assessed in individuals who exhibit chronic neck pain, cervical dysfunction and/or upper body dysfunction.

Study Summary

Study Design
Prospective correlation study

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Low Back Pain in College Athletes: A Prospective Study Correlating Lower Extremity Overuse or Acquired Ligamentous Laxity With Low Back Pain

Research Review: Low Back Pain in College Athletes: A Prospective Study Correlating Lower Extremity Overuse or Acquired Ligamentous Laxity With Low Back Pain

By William Chancey Sumner, PTA, MS, CES, CAFS, HMS, FRCms, c-PT

Edited by Brent Brookbush, DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Original Citation: 

Nadler, S., Wu, K., Galski, T., Feinberg, J. (1998). Low back pain in college athletes: a prospective study correlating lower extremity overuse or acquired ligamentous laxity with low back pain. Spine, 23(7), 828 – 833. ABSTRACT

Introduction:

Research suggest that approximately 25% of collegiate athletes have experienced low back pain (LBP) (1- 2). Potential causes may include biomechanical faults, lower extremity overuse, ligament laxity and gender differences have been identified as potential causes (3-8). This 1998 prospective study by American researchers demonstrates that collegiate athletes (especially females) with acquired lower extremity ligamentous and overuse injuries are more likely to develop LBP. This may suggest that assessing and addressing lower extremity impairments prior to activity may help re

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