Category:

Kinesiology Taping: Introduction

 

 

 

Lower Body

  1. Aguilar, M. B., Abian-Vicen, J., Halstead, J., & Gijon-Nogueron, G. (2015). Effectiveness of neuromuscular taping on pronated foot posture and walking plantar pressures in amateur runners. J Sci Med Sport. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2015.04.004
  2. Cho, H. Y., Kim, E. H., Kim, J., & Yoon, Y. W. (2015). Kinesio taping improves pain, range of motion, and proprioception in older patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial. In Am J Phys Med Rehabil (Vol. 94, pp. 192-200). United States.
  3. de-la-Torre-Domingo, C., Alguacil-Diego, I. M., Molina-Rueda, F., Lopez-Roman, A., & Fernandez-Carnero, J. (2015). Effect of Kinesiology Tape on Measurements of Balance in Subjects with Chronic Ankle Instability: a randomized clinical trial. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.06.022
  4. Donec, V., & Krisciunas, A. (2014). The effectiveness of Kinesio Taping(R) after total knee replacement in early postoperative rehabilitation period. A randomized controlled trial. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med, 50(4), 363-371.
  5. Hagen, L., Hebert, J. J., Dekanich, J., & Koppenhaver, S. (2015). The effect of elastic therapeutic taping on back extensor muscle endurance in patients with lo

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Kinesiology Taping: Lower Body

Kinesiology Taping: Lower Body

Diaphragm and Glute Taping (8:33)

Glute Activation Taping (8:35)

Tibial Internal Rotator Taping (8:04)

Tibialis Anterior Taping (9:34)

Toe Abduction Taping (7:00)

 

 

Lower Body

  1. Aguilar, M. B., Abian-Vicen, J., Halstead, J., & Gijon-Nogueron, G. (2015). Effectiveness of neuromuscular taping on pronated foot posture and walking plantar pressures in amateur runners. J Sci Med Sport. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2015.04.004
  2. Cho, H. Y., Kim, E. H., Kim, J., & Yoon, Y. W. (2015). Kinesio taping improves pain, range of motion, and proprioception in older patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial. In Am J Phys Med Rehabil (Vol. 94, pp. 192-200). United States.
  3. de-la-Torre-Domingo, C., Alguacil-Diego, I. M., Molina-Rueda, F., Lopez-Roman, A., & Fernandez-Carnero, J. (2015). Effect of Kinesiology Tape on Measurements of Balance in Subjects with Chronic Ankle Instability: a randomized clinical trial. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.06.022
  4. Donec, V., & Krisciunas, A. (2014). The effectiveness of Kinesio Taping(R) after total knee replacement in early postoperative rehabilitation period. A randomized controlle

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Kinesiology Taping: Upper Body

Kinesiology Taping: Upper Body
Lower Cervical Extensor Taping (6:43)

Lower Trapezius Activation (6:53)

Shoulder External Rotator Taping (6:53)

Wrist Extensor Taping (5:52)

Lumbar Taping (4:38)

Upper Body

  1. Aarseth, L. M., Suprak, D. N., Chalmers, G. R., Lyon, L., & Dahlquist, D. T. (2015). Kinesio Tape and Shoulder-Joint Position Sense. J Athl Train. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-50.7.03
  2. Burfeind, S. M., & Chimera, N. (2015). Randomized Control Trial Investigating the Effects of Kinesiology Tape on Shoulder Proprioception. J Sport Rehabil. doi:10-1123/jsr.2014-0233
  3. Devereaux, M., Velanoski, K. Q., Pennings, A., & Elmaraghy, A. (2015). Short-Term Effectiveness of Precut Kinesiology Tape Versus an NSAID as Adjuvant Treatment to Exercise for Subacromial Impingement: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Clin J Sport Med. doi:10.1097/jsm.0000000000000187
  4. Dong, W., Goost, H., Lin, X. B., Burger, C., Paul, C., Wang, Z. L., . . . Kabir, K. (2015a). Treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome: a PRISMA systematic review and network meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore), 94(10), e510. doi:10.1097/md.0000000000000510
  5. Dong, W., Goost, H., Lin, X. B., Burger, C., Paul, C., Wang, Z. L., . . . Kabir, K. (201

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IASTM: Plantar and Crural Fascia (Lower Leg)

IASTM: Plantar and Crural Fascia (Lower Leg)

By Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

 

 

Plantar Fascia (13:38)

Crural Fascia (21:18)

Crural Fascia

The crural (lower leg) fascia presents with a mean thickness of 924 μm (μm = micrometer = 1/1000 mm), and is composed of two or three layers of collagen fiber bundles with a mean thickness of 277.6 μm. A thin layer of loose connective tissue, with a mean thickness 43 μm, usually separates the different layers. In each layer, a prevalent direction of the fibers is recognizable, forming angles of 80–90° to those in adjacent layers (146, 147).  Surprisingly, elastin only exists at the borders of the crural fascia and in loose connective tissue, and is nearly absent in the layers of overlapping deep fascia (146).  This may imply that restrictions are not due to a loss of "elasticity," but rather movement between layers, or binding between layers that does not allow for the "uncrimping" of the wavy fascial sheaths. Although more research is needed, this hypothesis does seem to favor instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM), pin and stretch and other myofascial techniques that create shear

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IASTM: Thoracolumbar Fascia (Low Back)

IASTM: Thoracolumbar Fascia

By Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

 

Thoracolumbar Fascia (20:05)

The thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) is likely the most well researched fascial structure.  Much of the research cited on the potential of fascial tissue to contribute to movement, dysfunction and/or pain seems to be based on research performed on the TLF (6, 326-328, 335, 352, 354, 357-360, 366-367).  The TLF can be described as a 3 layer system, with the posterior layer having a deep and superficial laminae (layers), and the anterior layer often being omitted from movement analysis because it is thought to be too thin to contribute to lumbar stability (192, 337). (The anterior layer may be continuous with the posterior abdominal fascia). The division of the TLF into 3 layers (or 4 if counting the two layers of the posterior layer separately), is often described as a 2 layer system in research, combining the two laminae of the posterior layer and omitting the anterior layer all together.  The 3 layer system is used in this article.

Anatomy - The superficial laminae of the posterior layer is continuous with the latissimus dorsi, serratus posterior inferior, gluteus maximus, as well as part o

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