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Static Manual Release: Cervical Muscles - Suboccipitals, Sternocleidomastoid (SCM), Scalenes and Deep Cervical Extensors (Multifidi)

Static Manual Release: Suboccipitals, Sternocleidomastoid (SCM), Scalenes and Cervical Extensors (Multifidi)

(Cervical Dysfunction)

By Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Introduction

  • For a complete review of muscle fiber dysfunction, trigger point etiology, assessment and intervention, please check out:
    • Muscle Fiber Dysfunction and Trigger Points
    • Trigger Point Assessment, Palpation and Intervention (Coming Soon)

Techniques Covered in this Course:

  • Suboccipital Muscle Manual Static Release
  • Sternocleidomastoid (SCM) Manual Static Release
  • Scalenes Manual Static Release
  • Deep Cervical Extensor Manual Static Release

Signs of over-activity and/or a maladaptive decrease in length:

  • Overhead Squat Assessment:
    • Forward Head
    • Shoulders Elevate
  • Goniometry
    • Cervical Lateral Flexion < 35 - 45°
    • Note: Gross movement exams may be beneficial for identifying asymmetry, significant restriction, and pain with movement; however, cervical rotation, flexion and exte

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Static Manual Release: Cervical Muscles - Upper Trapezius, Levator Scapulae, Splenii

Static Manual Release: Upper Trapezius, Levator Scapulae and Splenii

(for Upper-Body Dysfunction and Cervical Dysfunction):

By Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

 

For a complete review of muscle fiber dysfunction, trigger point etiology, assessment and intervention, please check out:

  • Muscle Fiber Dysfunction and Trigger Points
  • Trigger Point Assessment, Palpation and Intervention (Coming Soon)

Techniques Covered in this Course:

  • Upper Trapezius Manual Static Release
  • Levator Scapulae Manual Static Release
  • Splenius Capitis and Splenius Cervicis Manual Static Release

Signs of over-activity and/or a maladaptive decrease in length:

  • Overhead Squat Assessment:
    • Forward Head
    • Shoulders Elevate
  • Goniometry
    • Cervical Lateral Flexion < 35 - 45°
    • Note: Gross movement exams may be beneficial for identifying asymmetry, significant restriction, and pain with movement; however, cervical rotation, flexion and extension are not reliable goniometric assessments.
  • Manual Mus

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Increased Trunk Muscle Latency May Cause, Rather than Result From, Low Back Pain

Research Review: Delayed Trunk Muscle Reflex Responses Increase the Risk of Low Back Injuries

By Stefanie DiCarrado DPT, PT, NASM CPT & CES

Edited by Amy Martinez DPT, PT

Edited by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Original Citation: 
Cholewicki, J., Silfies, S. P., Shah, R. A., Greene, H. S., Reeves, N. P., Alvi, K., & Goldberg, B. (2005). Delayed trunk muscle reflex responses increase the risk of low back injuries. Spine, 30(23), 2614-2620. ARTICLE

Introduction: 

A variety of factors contribute to the onset of low back pain (LBP) and injury (1-8). Several studies have demonstrated that impaired motor control is one factor that is predictive of future injury (9 - 11). This 2005 study by U.S. researchers demonstrated that delayed trunk muscle response to sudden unloading was correlated with future low back injury. Human movement professionals should consider screening for impairments in trunk muscle activation and addressing any issues with the intent of reducing the risk of injury.

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