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Static Manual Release: Hip External Rotators

Static Manual Release: Hip External Rotators

(for Lumbopelvic-hip Complex Dysfunction):

By Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

 

For a complete review of muscle fiber dysfunction, trigger point etiology, assessment and intervention, please check out:

  • Muscle Fiber Dysfunction and Trigger Points
  • Trigger Point Assessment, Palpation and Intervention (Coming Soon)

Techniques Covered in this Course:

  • Adductor Magnus Manual Static Release
  • Biceps Femoris Manual Static Release
  • Piriformis and Deep Rotators Manual Static Release

Signs of over-activity and/or a maladaptive decrease in length:

  • Overhead Squat Assessment:
    • Knees Bow Out
    • Asymmetrical Weight Shift
  • Goniometry
    • Hip Internal Rotation Goniometry in Prone <40 - 50°
    • Hip Internal Rotation Goniometry in Supine <35 - 45°
  • Manual Muscle Testing MMT:
    • Gluteus Maximus Manual Muscle Testing (MMT) - Weak or With Compensation (Lumbar extension and/or knee flexion)
    • Gluteu

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Low Back Pain in College Athletes: A Prospective Study Correlating Lower Extremity Overuse or Acquired Ligamentous Laxity With Low Back Pain

Research Review: Low Back Pain in College Athletes: A Prospective Study Correlating Lower Extremity Overuse or Acquired Ligamentous Laxity With Low Back Pain

By William Chancey Sumner, PTA, MS, CES, CAFS, HMS, FRCms, c-PT

Edited by Amy Martinez DPT, PT

Edited by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Original Citation: 

Nadler, S. F., Wu, K. D., Galski, T., & Feinberg, J. H. (1998). Low back pain in college athletes: a prospective study correlating lower extremity overuse or acquired ligamentous laxity with low back pain. Spine, 23(7), 828-833. ABSTRACT

Introduction: 

Research suggests that approximately 25% of collegiate athletes have experienced low back pain (LBP) (1- 2). Biomechanical faults, lower extremity (LE) overuse, ligament laxity and gender differences have been identified as potential causes (3-8). This 1998 prospective study by U.S. researchers demonstrates that collegiate athletes (especially females) with acquired LE ligamentous and overuse injuries are more likely to develop LBP. Human movement profes

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Selective Activation of the Infraspinatus Muscle

Research Review: Selective activation of the infraspinatus muscle.

By Stefanie DiCarrado DPT, PT, NASM CPT & CES

Edited by David Boettcher MSc, BA, NASM CPT, PES, CES & NPTI

Edited by Brent Brookbush DPT, PT, COMT, MS, PES, CES, CSCS, ACSM H/FS

Original Citation:

Ha, S., Kwon, O., Cynn, H., Lee, W., Kim, S., & Park, K. (2013). Selective activation of the infraspinatus muscle. Journal of athletic training, 48(3), 346-352. - ABSTRACT

Introduction:

The rotator cuff (RTC) muscles are commonly targeted during shoulder rehabilitation programs. Specifically, preferential activation of the infraspinatus is desired to address assessed weakness of the external rotators. This 2013 study, by Korean researchers, compared the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the infraspinatus, posterior deltoid and middle trapezius muscles during four commonly recommended RTC strengthening exercises. The study findings suggest external rotation with the arm supported at 90º of flexion increases infraspinatus activity and reduces recruitment of the posterior deltoid and trapezius muscles.

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